Shanghai Power Station of Art

My grandmother who is 77 yet in amazing shape both physically and mentally has taken the long journey to Shanghai. To visit me and to experience a tiny bit of China. I am so excited. To show her my life here, and to show her this amazing city. We often have some close times together in Denmark when I go to Årø - the tiny little island on the east coast of Denmark's mainland where she lives.

She arrived Friday and all weekend was one big rain shower. It has not rained like this for ages in Shanghai. My grandmother agrees with my that as we can not change the weather we just have to change how we feel about it. As she always says with a positive ring to it:

Comes Rain Comes Rest

Rain is a pretty awesome opportunity to get rest after a long trip. Or to get some indoor quality time together. Or to explore something you haven't seen before: for example Shanghai power station of Art. Last year I really wanted to go to their Andy Warhol exhibition but I did not get a change.

The power station hosts different and unique exhibitions all year around and this Saturday we impulsively went there hoping for an interesting or at least a different experience.

Several floors were being prepared for forthcoming exhibitions and the main attraction was an exhibition of the work of the famous Japanese architect Kazuo Shinohara. In addition to the associations to Scandinavian design that Kazuo's minimalistic work gave us, it was especially interesting because of his use of philosophy to describe the relationship between what he called human activity and architectural space. 

The power station is definitely worth a visit for example on a rainy lazy day. Their cafe were closed this weekend and their restaurant were hosting a private birthday party so we flagged our original plan of eating lunch here. Instead we combined the museum visit with a small lunch visit to the area Tianzifang which I also wanted my grandmother to experience. It is just a short taxi ride away. 

Shanghai Power Station of Art

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A house has to express beauty. I am convinced its space should reverberate with a fictive quality endowed by art
— Kazuo Shinohara, 1962
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I seek to supersede the awful spineless continuum of the everyday
— Kazuo Shinohara, 1971
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For me the contemporary city is thoroughly synchronic. That is to say, its different spaces don’t dissolve or absorb one another. Instead, each crystalizes in a definite outline, yet all remain interwoven.
— Kazuo Shinohara, 1975
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Personally, I do not wish to deny chaos, even if chaos itself, encompasses a premonition of destruction. In fact the giant village-like city before our eyes offers many sites of great activity
— Kazuo Shinohara, 1981
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Recently, I have become interested in the Random Noise provoked when you insert a discontinuity into the relative continuity of the everyday
— Kazuo Shinohara, 1988